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Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI Themes

David Grann
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Racism against Native Americans and white dominance

The history of the Osage tribe demonstrates the degree to which they were discriminated against and controlled by white Americans. The Osage were once a dominant presence in the land acquired through the Louisiana Purchase. At the time, President Jefferson recognized this, but immediately began referring to tribe members as his “children” (37). Though seemingly benevolent, this statement shows Jefferson’s discriminatory view of Native Americans. To him, the Osage were inferior to white Americans. They required protection and were unable to make decisions in the best interest of their tribe. Jefferson and subsequent leaders manifested these attitudes practically by twice relocating the Osage away from their land to make room for white settlers. This reflects the view that Native Americans deserved lesser consideration than their white counterparts. Simply because of their race and ancestry, the Osage had no claim to the land...

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This section contains 2,617 words
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Buy the Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI Study Guide
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