Forgot your password?  

Kant: A Very Short Introduction Chapter Summary & Analysis - Chapter 5: The Categorical Imperative Summary

Roger Scruton
This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Kant.
This section contains 776 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Kant: A Very Short Introduction Study Guide

Chapter 5: The Categorical Imperative Summary and Analysis

Before Kant can ground an ethical theory, he must first resolve what is commonly called the paradox freedom. The paradox highlights the apparent contradiction between one's sense of freedom—a person thinks that he is the cause of his own actions—and the seemingly universal law of causality that permeates with nature. A rock has no choice about falling off a cliff; whether it does or does not is determined by complex but determinate physical laws. Insofar as humans are part of the same physical universal, there seems no good reason to exclude them from the same necessity. Kant solves this problem by referring, once again, to his transcendental philosophy. He says that, considered empirically, humans are indeed part of the natural world and therefore not free. Considered transcendentally, however, that is, considered as objects in themselves...

(read more from the Chapter 5: The Categorical Imperative Summary)

This section contains 776 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Kant: A Very Short Introduction Study Guide
Copyrights
Kant: A Very Short Introduction from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook