Kant: A Very Short Introduction - Study Guide Chapter 4: The Logic of Illusion Summary & Analysis

Roger Scruton
This Study Guide consists of approximately 23 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Kant.
This section contains 1,146 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Kant: A Very Short Introduction Study Guide

While Kant obviously believed in the possibility of legitimate and substantive a prior knowledge, he was also aware that the faculty of reason was frequently perverted to arrive at conclusions for which it had no warrant. He considers the misuses of reasons in each of the categories he divides metaphysics into: rational psychology, the study of the soul; cosmology, the study of the universe; and theology, the study of God. Generally speaking, every mistake shares the same fundamental error: attempting to go beyond the boundaries of experience and get perspective and "unconditioned" knowledge. For Kant, all experience was necessarily conditioned, or interpreted, by the categories of thought and other mental structures. Since all knowledge is through experience—whether through experiencing particular objects or considering possible objects of experience—this tactic is methodologically flawed.

Kant's philosophy...

(read more from the Chapter 4: The Logic of Illusion Summary)

This section contains 1,146 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Kant: A Very Short Introduction Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Kant: A Very Short Introduction from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.