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Rudyard Kipling Writing Styles in The Jungle Book

This Study Guide consists of approximately 71 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Jungle Book.
This section contains 1,032 words
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Style

Points of View

The stories of Jungle Book are stories told in the third person by a narrator, as one might tell bedtime stories to children. Only in "The White Seal" and "Servants of the Queen," is the narrator actually mentioned, and then he is not identified. The reader gets the sense of a wise older narrator, one who is intimately familiar with Colonial Indian and the jungle therein, but not of it, as a British colonial officer would be. The narrator, for the most part, is impartial and allows the stories' characters to tell the story. Only occasionally does he interject, such as at the end of "Tiger, Tiger," when he tells us that the rest of Mowgli's story is a story for grownups. This is also true at the beginning of the "White Seal," where the narrator tells us of the winter wren that originally told him...

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This section contains 1,032 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Jungle Book Study Guide
Copyrights
The Jungle Book from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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