Janet Malcolm Writing Styles in The Journalist and the Murderer

This Study Guide consists of approximately 44 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Journalist and the Murderer.
This section contains 665 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Journalist and the Murderer Study Guide

Malcolm uses the first-person point of view throughout the book, which renders her a constant presence in the book. However, she complicates her position at the end of the book. In the afterword, Malcolm states that the journalist's—and her own— "I" character is "almost pure invention." She considers the "I" to function as a dispassionate narrator, one that can be as impartial as the third-person voice, which is much more widely used in nonfiction texts. Despite her claims, it is difficult at times to distinguish the narrative "I" from the Malcolm "I"; at one point she even makes certain to distinguish the two by referring to "(the actual) I." The ' T' puts forth strong assertions, such as the one that opens her work, but is this "I" simply expressing a narrative opinion or Malcolm's opinion? When Malcolm admits to long being troubled by the...

(read more from the Style section)

This section contains 665 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Journalist and the Murderer Study Guide
Copyrights
Nonfiction Classics for Students
The Journalist and the Murderer from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.