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The Japanese Quince Themes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 38 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Japanese Quince.
This section contains 621 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Japanese Quince Study Guide

Themes

Alienation

Mr. Nilson is alienated from both nature and humankind. Although he praises himself for taking a walk in the square on a beautiful morning, he takes his newspaper with him. Still, the strange sensation does not abate, and he suspects it might be caused by something he ate. Upon encountering the quince tree, his first instinct is to find out exactly what species it is, rather than simply enjoy the flowers. Towards the end of the story, when the blackbird resumes its singing, "that queer sensation, that choky feeling in his throat" returns, further underscoring his alienation from nature.

Related to Mr. Nilson's alienation from nature is the alienation he feels from humankind, which is demonstrated by his stilted exchange with Mr. Tandram. Though they have been next-door neighbors for five years, they have not yet introduced themselves to one another. Mr. Nilson blames this on his marital...

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This section contains 621 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Japanese Quince Study Guide
Copyrights
The Japanese Quince from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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