The Japanese Quince - Analysis Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 29 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Japanese Quince.
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The story is told from the perspective of a third person omniscient narrator that means that the reader is privy to the thoughts and motivations of the main character, without that character revealing them himself. By the author's use of this perspective, the reader understands Mr. Nilson's flood of feelings about the spring morning, as well as his discomfort around Mr. Tandram. A basic third person narrator would be able to comment on the actions and descriptions of the scene, not the internal thoughts and emotions.

The blackbird plays an important role because of its mystical symbolism of both fear and promise. The blackbird lures both men to the Japanese Quince tree to revel in its beauty, but the presence of the other man is uncomfortable for both. They fear the proximity and the intimate setting.

It is interesting to note that Mr. Tandram, whose name closely mimics...

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This section contains 337 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Japanese Quince Study Guide
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Short Stories for Students
The Japanese Quince from Short Stories for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.