Compare & Contrast I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years, 1933-1941 by Victor Klemperer

Victor Klemperer
This Study Guide consists of approximately 74 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of I Will Bear Witness.
This section contains 302 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years, 1933-1941 Study Guide

1930s: Germans often keep private diaries in which they can express their true opinions and feelings. Fear of discovery is a risk, and many diaries are self-censored by using pseudonyms, euphemisms, and vague references.

Today: In the United States, freedom of speech is a constitutionally protected right enjoyed by all citizens. Americans freely criticize the government and its institutions.

1930s: Klemperer writes on March 17, 1933, that some German papers are permanently banned while others are sometimes banned for a few days. Government control of the press becomes an important means of influencing public opinion and maintaining support for the regime.

Today: Freedom of the press is protected by constitutional law in the United States. No matter how extreme the point of view, anyone has the right to print a newspaper expressing it. This freedom extends to harsh criticism of the government and its officials.

1930s: On April 20, 1933, Germany...

(read more)

This section contains 302 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years, 1933-1941 Study Guide
Copyrights
Nonfiction Classics for Students
I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years, 1933-1941 from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook