Intoxicated by My Illness and Other Writings on Life and Death Themes & Motifs

Anatole Broyard
This Study Guide consists of approximately 47 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Intoxicated by My Illness and Other Writings on Life and Death.
This section contains 2,506 words
(approx. 7 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Intoxicated by My Illness and Other Writings on Life and Death Study Guide

Doctor-Patient Relations

“Part Three: The Patient Examines the Doctor” is essentially an indictment of the aloofness doctors assume when treating the critically ill. Throughout Intoxicated By My Illness, Anatole Broyard critiques the modern doctor-patient relationship. Broyard wants doctors to share more of themselves with their patient, entering into a healing relationship in which both parties are mutually trusted and respected.

The central problem the Broyard has with both of his urologists is that they are too nondescript and do not have conversations with him: they are silent, effective, and entirely impersonal medical machines. He gives one Kafkaesque description of a group of doctors at Saint Vincent’s Hospital in the opening paragraph of the essay recounting:

“I had a very curious relationship with the doctors. They came in groups of six. They seemed to be attached to each other like Siamese sextuplets. They looked at me. They...

(read more)

This section contains 2,506 words
(approx. 7 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Intoxicated by My Illness and Other Writings on Life and Death Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Intoxicated by My Illness and Other Writings on Life and Death from BookRags. (c)2017 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook