Indian Captive: The Story of Mary Jemison Symbols & Objects

Lois Lenski
This Study Guide consists of approximately 64 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Indian Captive: The Story of Mary Jemison.
This section contains 888 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
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Corn

Corn is symbolic in all of the places Molly lives. In her hometown, she helps her father raise corn. In both Indian villages, she does the same. The corn is the substance that keeps them all alive, fed, and well. It is also several times throughout the story a place of refuge for Molly, to hide, cry, or explore memories. The corn silk tassel is also very important because it is the color of Molly’s hair and is used in the Indian name she is given—Corn Tassel.

The Peach Tree

The blossoming peach tree at the first fort is a sign of hope for Molly. She has one like it at her home and sees it as the bright and beautiful thing that is growing by the evil looking, scary walls of the fort. When she returns for a second visit, her hope is...

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This section contains 888 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Indian Captive: The Story of Mary Jemison Study Guide
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