The Iliad - Book 13 Summary & Analysis

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Book 13 Summary

Now that the Greeks have been driven back to their ships by the Trojans, Zeus leaves the battle on auto-pilot, while he casts his eyes over the rest of his territory. He isn't concerned about taking his eyes off the battlefield, because he is confident none of the other gods will have the temerity to interfere while he is otherwise engaged. This confidence may be misplaced since Hera and Athena have already disobeyed him, but as Zeus is the most powerful of the gods, he persists in believing no one will cross him.

Poseidon is the brother of Zeus, however, and nearly as powerful, so he is the next of the lesser gods to disobey and intervene in the war. He disguises himself as the soothsayer, Kalchas, and appears to the two Aiases, or Aiantes (Great Ajax and little Ajax.). He flatters them that they remember the...

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This section contains 571 words
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The Iliad from Epics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.