Mark Twain Writing Styles in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was a breakthrough in American literature for its pre sentation of Huck Finn, an adolescent boy who tells the story in his own language. The novel was one of the first in America to employ the child's perspective and employ the vernacular—a language specific to a region or group of people throughout the book. Many critics have characterized the smoothness of Huck's language as the most unique feature of the book. Lionel Trilling sees Twain's creation of Huck's voice as a measure of his genius. He writes that Huck's language has "the immediacy of the heard voice." Shelley Fisher Fishkin has suggested that Twain created Huck's style of speech from that of a real boy, an African-American child that he met in the early 1870s, combined with dialects of white people he had heard as a child. But Huck's unique perspective...

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This section contains 830 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Study Guide
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.