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Howard's End Social Concerns

This Study Guide consists of approximately 109 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Howard's End.
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Social Concerns

E.M. Forster begins Howards End with two thematic signals so simple and so innocent that the unsuspecting firsttime reader may fail to comprehend their importance—at least until the end of the piece. The novel opens with a letter from Helen Schlegel to her sister Margaret that begins with a description of the house at Howards End: "It is old and little, and altogether delightful—red brick." Later in the letter she reports that "The air here is delicious." Following the epistolary exchange, Forster moves the setting to Wickham Place, London, from the country to the still peaceful city, to a house "fairly quiet, for a lofty promontory of buildings separated it from the main thoroughfare. Though the promontory consisted of flats—expensive with cavernous entrance halls, full of concierges and palms—it fulfilled its purpose, and gained for the older houses opposite...

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This section contains 1,055 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Howard's End Study Guide
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Howard's End from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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