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The Horse and His Boy Literary Qualities

This Study Guide consists of approximately 74 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Horse and His Boy.
This section contains 681 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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Literary Qualities

The structure of The Horse and His Boy illustrates a simple and universal pattern in literature, that of a journey. Basically, a novel structured around a journey has a starting place and a goal, in this case two starting places, Shasta's home among the coastal hills in southeast Calormen and Aravis's palace home in south-central Calormen, with the goal being Narnia. The attractions of a journey narrative are the events that occur during the journey. These can be very complicated, as in Homer's epic The Odyssey, in which the main character Odysseus takes ten years to reach home while he encounters various predicaments and ingenuously solves them. In The Horse and His Boy, Lewis builds his narrative around a series of markers: Aravis and Shasta's homes, their first encounter with lions, Tashbaan, the Desert, the Hermit's home, and Anvard, with each having its own adventures and representing a...

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This section contains 681 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Horse and His Boy Study Guide
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The Horse and His Boy from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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