Hope Was Here - Chapters 7 and 8 Summary & Analysis

Joan Bauer
This Study Guide consists of approximately 34 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Hope Was Here.
This section contains 883 words
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Chapters 7 and 8 Summary

Chapter 7

Hope was unpacked and settled in her new room. It was nice but it didn't feel like home. She recalled how she felt in the different cities she lived in. She glanced at her boxing gloves—an unusual item for a girl. She had learned to box when she was just eleven. Addie had encouraged her. She knew instinctively that Hope needed a way to vent her anger. Although Hope never fought with anyone, she remembered really pounding away on the punching bag.

Hope looked at her "Dads" scrapbook. Over the years, she had clipped pictures in magazines of men who looked like fathers. They were usually smiling and holding a child's hand. She had a fantasy conversation with her "dad," telling him she was having a hard time adjusting to her life in Wisconsin. Hope was at work early. She overheard Lou Ellen complaining about her—that Hope had just waltzed in and got a job.

Adam Pulver was in the diner, telling G. T. about his uncle Sid who was a spin doctor—someone who could take bad news, spin it around and make it good news. He had helped an underdog candidate turn his fortunes around and win his election. Uncle Sid planned to stop by the diner and meet with G. T. The next day, G. T., Sid Vole, Pastor Hall and Slick Bixby, the town's barber, all met in the diner for breakfast. Sid told G. T. that no matter what question he is asked, he should respond with a statement about his vision for the town. Sid commented that G. T.'s cancer could "work" for him. He could get the sympathy vote and Millstone could demonize himself if he was too harsh with him. Slick commented that G. T. was not the type to play dirty.

The hearse pulled up in front of the diner again. G. T. walked out the door to the hearse and shook the driver's hand. Meeting the enemy. G. T. invited the man in and gave him a free breakfast. G. T. commented that everyone should live like there's a hearse parked in front of their door. When the diners observed G. T.'s kindness toward the thug, they lined up to sign his petition.

Chapter 8

The kids had gotten over two hundred signatures and were waiting for the official word from the election board. The town was abuzz with politics and there was suspicion that the tax assessor's office was up to something shady when the office suddenly closed.

G. T. gave Hope a tour of the backyard where he had planted a big tree twenty-five years ago when he married and a small dogwood tree when his wife died four years before. He pointed out trees he planted to honor other friends. He liked to plant trees because they'd be there long after he and his loved ones. It reminded Hope of her habit of carving her initials in the different diners she worked in. Just then Adam called out to G. T. The Election Board had disqualified fifty-five signatures. G. T. was off the ballot! Sid wasn't worried. He'd challenge the Board in the morning.

That evening, Lou Ellen broke down. Her baby was not eating and not sitting up the way a fourteen-month-old should. Hope tried to comfort her, taking over her tables and letting her to go home. A large group of hungry hunters entered the diner. Hope warned Braverman about the onslaught. Hope recruited Yuri to help serve the guests. The crew got through the night without a hitch. Braverman complimented Hope on how well she handled the crowd. She returned the compliment.

Chapters 7 and 8 Analysis

Chapter 7

Since Hope does not yet feel at home in her new home, she has thoughts of the father she never had. She envisions him as a caring, happy man who would always protect her and take time to talk with her about her fears and concerns. In stark contrast to the very down-to-earth, honest G. T., Sid Vole, a political spin doctor enters the story. He advises G. T. to avoid answering questions and to use his illness to gain sympathy that would translate into votes. But G. T. is an honest, straight-forward person, not interested in treating his opponent harshly or using his cancer to scare up votes. He proves Sid wrong. When he treats the mayor's lackey with friendship and respect, the diners all flock to support him.

Chapter 8

Hope and G. T. are growing closer. He seems to see something special in her. Perhaps G. T. is the father figure that she's been searching for. She may be afraid to get too close to him because he may not have long to live. And she would face yet another loss, or abandonment, in her young life. It looks as though the Election Board and the Tax Assessor's office might be in the pocket of the large dairy owner. It is obvious that the Board is trying to keep G. T. off the ballot. Hope has shown her maturity by reaching out to Lou Ellen who has never been very nice to her. Hope and Braverman are growing closer. Perhaps there is a budding romance.

This section contains 883 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
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