Hope Was Here - Chapters 5 and 6 Summary & Analysis

Joan Bauer
This Study Guide consists of approximately 34 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Hope Was Here.
This section contains 819 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)

Chapters 5 and 6 Summary

Chapter 5

Back at the the Welcome Stairways, the diner was packed. Hope was given the counter to take care of and Addie was struggling to keep up with all the orders. Sheriff Greebs entered and announced that the diner had too many people and was over the safety limit. He ushered some of the diners outside. Lou Ellen was annoyed that Hope filled the coffee cups of the guests at one of her tables. Someone hollered across the room to G. T. and asked him if the campaign would be too hard on him. He responded that he was focused more on living than on dying. He said that he tried to talk to the mayor about the dairy farm's unpaid taxes but he refused to discuss it with him.

Flo introduced Hope to her friend Brenda Babcock, who was a deputy sheriff and one of the prettiest women that Hope at ever seen. G. T. asked the diners to sign his petition to run for mayor. He needed two hundred signatures. Many were reluctant and made up excuses why they couldn't sign it. A lot of townspeople worked for the dairy. Hope had a rough first day. She recalled things her mother had taught her about being a waitress. Addie always told her that her mother loved her but having the responsibility of a child was just difficult for her. Braverman told her she could help with G. T.'s campaign even though she was too young to vote.

Hope got frustrated when she was left to lock up and couldn't get the key to work. Suddenly, G. T. came by and told her he had trouble with the door too, and that it wasn't her fault. He locked the door and told her to get some rest. She smiled when he told her she was a good waitress.

Chapter 6

The next day, Adam Pulver organized a group of teenagers, including Hope and Braverman, to get signatures for G. T.'s petition. Each kid was equipped with pens, a clipboard and a signature page. They had to make sure that anyone who signed the petition was a registered voter. Hope and Braverman worked as a team. Braverman was quick to defend G. T. and explained why he as qualified for mayor. He'd remind reluctant voters how G. T. had the crumbling stairs at the high school fixed, served on the school board and brought poor people food. Hope encountered a rude man who refused to sign the petition. She thought to herself that her own father wouldn't act like that.

Many voters were afraid of losing jobs at the dairy. Braverman commented that there were rumors that the dairy owner funded the current mayor's campaign and Millstone, in turn, let them get away with anything they wanted to do. Mayor Millstone built a big, fancy new house last year. He claimed his wife inherited the money to pay for it, but a lot of people thought he was lying. The Mayor and the dairy owner, Cranston Broom, were fishing buddies.

Braverman did a lot of tricks with his yo-yo, which impressed Hope. She was beginning to think he was really cute. The kids returned to the diner to check the signatures they had gotten against the list of registered voters. One of Millstone's supporters drove a hearse up and parked it in front of the diner. Braverman became angry and headed for the door but was stopped by G. T., who told him to sit down. They were bullies and wanted to rile them up.

Chapters 5 and 6 Analysis

Chapter 5

Lou Ellen might be resentful of Hope's presence in the diner. She's a young girl and Hope may represent a threat to her. A lot of the diners are reluctant to sign G. T.'s petition for mayor. Perhaps they are afraid of retribution from the current mayor and from the dairy owner. It seems as though many of the townspeople are bullied and feel threatened. Hope often thinks of her mother who was also a waitress. Addie tries to comfort Hope about her mother's abandonment of her, but there is obviously a lot of hurt in Hope's heart over her mother's actions. Even though it's been years, she still feels a lot of pain and conflict.

Chapter 6

It appears as though Hope and Braverman are building a friendship. She thinks to herself that Braverman is cute. More is revealed about the relationship between Mayor Millstone and the dairy owner, Cranston Broom. The new house the mayor built may have been funded by bribes from Broom. The supporters of Millstone behave in a thuggish manner. They play dirty which was especially apparent when one of his supporters parked a hearse in front of G. T.'s diner—reminding the voters in the area that the man opposing the mayor is dying.

This section contains 819 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
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