Homegoing Symbols & Objects

Yaa Gyasi
This Study Guide consists of approximately 81 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Homegoing.
This section contains 896 words
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The Black Stones

The story's two black stones can be seen as representing, on one level, the power of family; and, on another level, how that power is defined by connection with the family's place of origin (Africa). In this context, it is important to note how, at the novel's conclusion, the most recent representative of the American family line is given the stone that has been passed down the African family line.

Early in the narrative, the mother of the two sisters who are the matriarchal ancestors of the two family lines that are the focus of the book's two narrative lines gives each sister a black stone, flecked with gold. The first of the two sisters, Effia, passes her stone to her daughter, and from there it is passed down through the succeeding generations, almost all of whom stay in Africa. The second of the...

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This section contains 896 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Homegoing Study Guide
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