Heart of a Samurai - Chapter 17 Summary & Analysis

Margi Preus
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Chapter 17 Summary

Because Manjiro cannot write, he records all of the differences between America and Japan in his mind. At two different churches, two different Sunday mornings, Manjiro notices the way the church elders and deacons look at him funny. When Manjiro asks the captain what it is, the captain angrily tells Manjiro that the deacons think Manjiro should sit in the seats reserved for negroes.

Chapter 17 Analysis

Manjiro is experiencing racism for the first time. Manjiro also learns that he can be the change in the world or he can sit back and watch as everything happens. It also appears as if Mrs. Whitfield is ahead of her time. She's talking about a world where slavery and segregation is abolished, and where women have the same rights as men.

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This section contains 133 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Heart of a Samurai Study Guide
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Heart of a Samurai from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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