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Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom Chapter Summary & Analysis - Chapter 11, Bittersweet Victory Summary

Catherine Clinton
This Study Guide consists of approximately 42 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Harriet Tubman.
This section contains 647 words
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Chapter 11, Bittersweet Victory Summary

After the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, the commander at Port Royal was urged to create a spy network in the region using local refugees. Tubman had a great deal of experience in planning clandestine journeys, and she was given authority to recruit scouts and map the interior of South Carolina. This operation was under the authority of the secretary of war.

In June 1863, the Combahee River Raid took place. It was an important turn for Tubman since she would be named as someone who helped in the plan. The plan was for three boats of Union troops, including 150 black soldiers, to travel up the Combahee River and surprise slaveholders there. The soldiers burned buildings and took what goods they could find. Over 750 slaves were freed.

Encouraged by this raid, Union troops continued to infiltrate the interior. Black soldiers were happy to be able to...

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This section contains 647 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom Study Guide
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Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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