Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom - Study Guide Chapter 5, The Liberty Lines Summary & Analysis

Catherine Clinton
This Study Guide consists of approximately 32 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Harriet Tubman.
This section contains 650 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom Study Guide

Although the role and scope of the UGRR is unknown and debated, it is an important historically. Few records or information remain about its participants or their activities. Thomas Garrett was one of the famous stationmasters. He lived in Wilmington, Delaware and may have helped Harriet in her escape. He was arrested for helping slaves and fined for his activities. This did not stop him, however, and he continued to provide aid to fugitives. Both whites and blacks were active in the UGRR, although blacks faced greater dangers in doing so. Frederick Douglas helped nearly four hundred fugitives.

It is unknown when the UGRR began. Blacks escaping before the 1840s do not report the existence of the network. Its genesis may have come from increased pressure as southern bounty hunters began pursuing fugitives more aggressively and taking free blacks as well...

(read more from the Chapter 5, The Liberty Lines Summary)

This section contains 650 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook