The Great God Brown Essay

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In The Great God Brown O'Neill attacks the "materialism of modern society." Carpenter examines this aspect through O'Neill's use of symbolism throughout the play.

The Great God Brown magnified this American dualism of the materialistic and the romantic to universal proportions. William A. Brown like his contemporary American, George F. Babbitt became the "god" of our materialism. But in rejecting this false American "god," O'Neill's hero again rejected American democracy: Dion turned away from "the rabble" because "he hated to share with them fountain, flame and fruit." That is, his romantic idealism became wholly negative. Like other Americans, he even began to worship the devil because God would not grant him his absolute ideal: "When Pan was forbidden the light and warmth of the sun he grew sensitive and self-conscious and proud and revengeful and became Prince of Darkness." And so Dion the romantic dreamer turned against the...

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This section contains 1,367 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Great God Brown Study Guide
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Drama for Students
The Great God Brown from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.