The Grand Inquisitor - The First Temptation Summary & Analysis

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The First Temptation Summary

The Inquisitor launches the first volley of substance for his argument, saying that, in refusing to turn stones into bread, Christ gave people freedom, and, consequently, is to blame for all human misery. The Inquisitor appears to know why Christ refused to turn stones into bread: performing a miracle and using the proceeds feed people, materially, would have established him as the Son of God, but this would come at the price of taking the freedom to choose away. Bread would be both a bribe and corroboration for divinity. People would be fed, and would happily follow Christ, but in fear rather than in freedom. After all, Christ might decide to take the bread away.

What is going to happen as a result of Christ's choice in the wilderness, the Inquisitor says, is that somewhere down the line, all of humanity will rise...

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This section contains 1,013 words
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The Grand Inquisitor from Short Stories for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.