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Gilgamesh: Man's First Story Social Sensitivity

Bernarda Bryson Shahn
This Study Guide consists of approximately 51 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Gilgamesh.
This section contains 336 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Gilgamesh: Man's First Story Study Guide

Social Sensitivity

Each of the principal gods of Gilgamesh represents an aspect or force of nature, and such pantheism is not unusual in old myths. Although a modern reader might be tempted to label the religion of the Mesopotamians as mere "superstition," the text repeatedly demonstrates that these people took their deities seriously. The reader must accept the fact that the persons in the tale have a close relationship with their gods, which are assigned human traits as well as supernatural powers. What is striking is the erratic behavior of the deities. Even Anu, the chief of the gods, argues in an almost perverse human manner with the elders when they propose the creation of Enkidu. He likes Gilgamesh and enjoys the high walls that he has built simply because he likes to sit on them and watch the activities of the humans in the city.

An unsettling aspect of...

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This section contains 336 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Gilgamesh: Man's First Story Study Guide
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Gilgamesh: Man's First Story from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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