Galileo - Scenes IX - X Summary & Analysis

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Scenes IX - X Summary

Scene IX: Scene IX is a carnival scene not involving any of the primary characters. It depicts April Fool's Day, 1632. A ballad singer sings about the established order of the universe with the earth at the center and the strict hierarchy thereafter (Cardinals circle Pope, Bishops circle Cardinals, etc.). The singer then states how Galileo's revelations have disrupted this view of the universe. Without this order, the singer sardonically sings (in verse), the peasants are likely to act out and do what they please. A "dwarf-astronomer" and other carnival dancers and performers act out the singer's words as they delight and amuse the gathered crowd.

The ballad singer reveals more consequences of this new disorder. Carpenters will build for themselves, and not the church. Tenants might oust their lords. Farmers may use their cows' milk to feed their babies instead of...

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This section contains 671 words
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Buy the Galileo Study Guide
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