Friedman's Fables - Interlude Summary & Analysis

Edwin Friedman
This Study Guide consists of approximately 39 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Friedman's Fables.
This section contains 548 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Friedman's Fables Study Guide

Interlude Summary

Two famous characters from literature debate the best way for humanity to realize truths about itself, and for humans to realize truths about THEM-selves. Faust (a medieval scholar who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for more knowledge) argues that external, objective knowledge is the best and most effective way to realizing truth. Oedipus argues that searching and understanding within the self is the way to truth. As part of his argument, Faust comments that "the essential question of human existence is not how your family did you in; it's maintaining your integrity." In other words, look to the future for inspiration, not to the past for blame. For his part, Oedipus argues that external knowledge has buried essential understanding and/or acceptance of nature beneath jargon.

Their argument is interrupted by the arrival of another literary figure, Cassandra, the Trojan...

(read more from the Interlude Summary)

This section contains 548 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Friedman's Fables Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Friedman's Fables from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook