Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself - Study Guide Chapter 4 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 101 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself.
This section contains 851 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself Study Guide

At this point in his narrative, Douglass tells how the slaveholders were able to get away with just about anything in their mistreatment of the slaves, including murder. The Chapter begins with the less-onerous master, Mr. Hopkins, being replaced with the most-feared, heartless master, Austin Gore. Douglass makes the assumption that this change was due to the fact that Mr. Hopkins was not severe enough with the slaves.

Douglass describes Gore as being ruthless and violent in his punishment of the slaves. When he accuses a slave of something, the slave is not allowed to talk back, and is to be severely punished. If the slave is wrongfully accused, it's irrelevant to Gore. Gore is described as cold, heartless, and humorless, and he expects noting but strict and immediate obedience from a slave. Because of this, it is clear that he strikes fear into the heart of...

(read more from the Chapter 4 Summary)

This section contains 851 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself Study Guide
Copyrights
Nonfiction Classics for Students
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.