Freaky Friday Social Sensitivity

This Study Guide consists of approximately 35 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Freaky Friday.
This section contains 216 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Freaky Friday Study Guide

Freaky Friday makes no pretense of being a work of great social significance.

The Andrews family lives a comfortable and affluent life with father employed in advertising, mother not working outside the home, and both children in private school. This is the Manhattan of E. B. White's Stuart Little, of Elizabeth Enright's The Saturdays, and of E. L. Konigsberg's From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. There are no characters from minority backgrounds, no working class characters except the Andrews' German cleaning woman, no poor people. In fact, no social issues are raised at all, except perhaps that Mrs. Schmauss the cleaning woman's remarks about "colored" people offend Annabel nearly as much as her gin drinking.

Although it is difficult to see how anyone could be seriously bothered by the social attitudes of this book, some young readers might find it hard to relate...

(read more)

This section contains 216 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Freaky Friday Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Freaky Friday from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook