Foxfire 8 - Southern Folk Pottery: An Appriciation - The Meaders Pottery Summary & Analysis

Eliot Wigginton
This Study Guide consists of approximately 32 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Foxfire 8.
This section contains 1,139 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Foxfire 8 Study Guide

Southern Folk Pottery: An Appriciation - The Meaders Pottery Summary and Analysis

John Burrison introduces the pottery of the Appalachian area. Burrison notes folk potters, or those who use limited industrial equipment, are few and far between, and that folk pottery is not a mountain craft by nature. He also points out the craft is not recreational, but a business activity for most. He notes that traditions were spread westward, including alkaline glazes and certain pottery styles such as the two handled syrup jug, pottery grave markers, and the face jugs, which are containers with large, stylized faces protruding from them. Some equipment is also unique to the region, such as the rectangular kiln, which, when surrounded by earth, were called groundhog kilns. He finishes by noting one can see such pottery in the Smithsonian, private museums...

(read more from the Southern Folk Pottery: An Appriciation - The Meaders Pottery Summary)

This section contains 1,139 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Foxfire 8 Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Foxfire 8 from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook