Ernest Hemingway Writing Styles in For Whom the Bell Tolls

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Point of View

The novel presents the narrative through an omniscient point of view that continually shifts back and forth between the characters. In this way, Hemingway can effectively chronicle the effect of the war on the men and women involved. The narrator shifts from Anselmo's struggles in the snow during his watch to Pilar's story about Pablo's execution of Fascists and El Sordo's lonely death to help readers more clearly visualize their experiences.

In "Ringing the Changes: Hemingway's 'Bell' Tolls Fifty," Michael Reynolds writes, "Without drawing undue attention to his artistry, Hemingway has written a collection of short stories embedded in a framing novel." Against the backdrop of the group's attempt to blow up the bridge, each character tells his or her own story: Maria tells of her parents' murder and her rape; Jordan shares what he learned about the true politics of war at Gaylord's in Madrid...

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This section contains 353 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the For Whom the Bell Tolls Study Guide
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Novels for Students
For Whom the Bell Tolls from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.