Foreign Affairs - Chapter 6 Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 6 Summary

Pausing in Kensington Gardens in order not to be early to Rosemary's party, Fred is happy to have won the cleaning lady argument. Mrs. Harris, whom he has not yet met, sounds great: a hard worker who does not talk Rosemary's ear off about her long-divorced alcoholic husband. Fred is his normal confident self again, no longer feeling like an ectoplasmal tourist and fully recovered from his homophobia and shock over the Billings' domestic arrangement. Through Rosemary, he has come to see how civilized the British system is, avoiding the open scandal, self-righteous jealousy, frantic defensiveness and public displays common in American "open marriages." A loan from the Corinth University Credit Union has eased Fred's budget, so he has only two concerns: the slowness of his writing and a letter from Roo. Euphoria over Rosemary is as disruptive as depression was and the...

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This section contains 1,358 words
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Buy the Foreign Affairs Study Guide
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