For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War - Chapter 12, The Same Holy Cause Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 28 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of For Cause and Comrades.
This section contains 418 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War Study Guide

Chapter 12, The Same Holy Cause Summary and Analysis

Civil War soldiers suffered all the same psychological traumas that men of later years would know under the names "shell shock," "battle fatigue," and so on. They saw these traumas as challenges, however. This commitment often produced breakdowns, particularly when coupled with constant marching, little sleep, hunger and extreme temperatures. Combat stress increased most dramatically in the last year of the war and both sides often fell to combat exhaustion.

Post-traumatic stress disorder can also be identified from some war reports and letters. The campaigns of 1864 produced these disorders most clearly. Modern psychologists have shown that a regiment's psychology is completely wrecked by the time it loses one-third of its strength, and this occurred in many cases during the Civil War. By the time 1864 came, many men were simply fighting to stay alive...

(read more from the Chapter 12, The Same Holy Cause Summary)

This section contains 418 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.