Flirtin' with the Monster: Your Favorite Authors on Ellen Hopkins' Crank and Glass - Reality-Based Memoir vs. Non-Fiction by Cinda Williams Chima Summary & Analysis

Niki Burnham
This Study Guide consists of approximately 28 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Flirtin' with the Monster.
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Reality-Based Memoir vs. Non-Fiction by Cinda Williams Chima Summary and Analysis

Even though Ellen Hopkins was telling true stories in "Crank" and "Glass," she decided to make it a fictionalized account inspired by true events. Recent scandals about true stories not really being truthful have made the reading public skeptical. Two recent examples are: "A Million Little Pieces" and "Misha: A Memoir of the Holocaust Years," which were both proven to be mainly fiction.

The purpose of a memoir is to tell the truth, deliver a story and help both the reader and writer make sense of an experience or life. Some critics are a little more lenient as to what the "truth" is although journalists are more prone to demand verifiable facts. Novelist Anna Quindlen vows to never write her memoir because she has a bad memory...

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This section contains 511 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Flirtin' with the Monster: Your Favorite Authors on Ellen Hopkins' Crank and Glass Study Guide
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