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The Feminine Mystique Chapter Summary & Analysis - Chapter 1, The Problem That Has No Name Summary

This Study Guide consists of approximately 125 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Feminine Mystique.
This section contains 824 words
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Chapter 1, The Problem That Has No Name Summary

Betty Friedan begins her book with a description of the problem. The problem, which has been buried for many years, is dissatisfaction and a longing in suburban housewives. Generally, the more education and ability a woman possessed, the more she suffered from the problem that has no name. The majority of women suffered in silence. Those seeking help with these feelings of inner longing were usually advised to seek fulfillment as a wife and mother. Many were labeled as neurotic.

Women during this time were taught to pity unfeminine career women. Feminine women did not want things like an education, career or independence. This changing view of women was reflected in college enrollment. Friedan offers statistics to back up this idea. In the year 1920 forty seven percent of college students were female, by 1958 this figure...

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This section contains 824 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Feminine Mystique Study Guide
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The Feminine Mystique from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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