Essays & Lectures - Book 4: The Conduct of Life : Chapter 17, Fate & More Summary & Analysis

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Book 4: The Conduct of Life : Chapter 17, Fate & More Summary and Analysis

"A man's fortunes are the fruit of his character," (p. 963). "History is the action and reaction of these two, - Nature and Thought," (p. 964). While leaving a great deal else unsaid, this tells readers a great deal. Fate here is finally also defined by the phrase Beautiful Necessity. II Power: In contrast to fate, the first principle in this essay is that rather than luck, there are laws of nature - one of these pertains to how discipline nurtures skill while nature - belonging to fate, delivers talent. Human endeavor is the intentional use of these laws to "making luck". Emerson writes of how an exceptionally bold man may take a ship to New England with his energy whereas a lesser man may do fine within his...

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