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Compare & Contrast The End of the Affair by Graham Greene

This Study Guide consists of approximately 71 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The End of the Affair.
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1940s: The Catholic Church still forbids cremation as a means of disposing of a dead body. Catholics are buried in the ground or in tombs. This is a tradition from the days of the early Christians.

Today: As of 1963, Catholics are permitted to choose cremation as an alternative to traditional means of burial. The Church still encourages keeping the body intact, and, if the body is to be cremated, the Church prefers that it be done after the funeral liturgy so that the body may be present for the ceremony. Still, Catholics are not forbidden to be cremated or to have the cremated remains present at the ceremony.

1940s: Penicillin has recently been made widely available and is used to treat a wide variety of illnesses, including pneumonia. Because pneumonia is a major health concern, doctors are relieved to be able to reduce the number of mortalities...

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This section contains 321 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The End of the Affair Study Guide
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The End of the Affair from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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