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Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead Themes

Andrew Hudgins
This Study Guide consists of approximately 42 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead.
This section contains 1,453 words
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Themes

Parents and Children

Hudgins's elegy for his still-living father is certainly not the only poem that blends his preoccupation with his parents' death and dying. "My Father's Corpse" humorously reconstructs a memory from early childhood:

[my father] lay stone still, pretended to be dead.
My brothers and I, tiny, swarmed over him
like puppies. He wouldn't move. We tickled him
. . .
. . . . We pushed small fingers up
inside his nostrils, wiggled them, and giggled.
He wouldn't move.

It wasn't until the little boys became alarmed that young Andrew himself aggressively tested the limits of his father's pretense:

[and] slammed my forehead on his face. He rose,
he rose up roaring, scattered us from his body
and, as he raged, we sprawled at his feet—thrilled
to have the resurrected bastard back.









It would be unfair to say that Andrew Hudgins is "obsessed" with his relationship to his parents and kin but...

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This section contains 1,453 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead Study Guide
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Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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