Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead Summary & Study Guide

Andrew Hudgins
This Study Guide consists of approximately 32 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead.
This section contains 805 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead Study Guide

Lines 1-2

As though the reader were a listening friend, Hudgins's first two lines declare a personal "fact" in a simple sentence with plain words. "One day," he surmises, someone will call, and he'll hear that his father has died. It will be somewhat expected, however, because his father is elderly, and "he's ready." It's not unusual to hear aging or seriously ill people claim they're "ready" to die. The poem begins in familiar language with a familiar situation.

Lines 7-9        

But after all, this is death, a serious sort of trip, so "I think he wants to go" is quickly qualified in the next line with "a little bit." The poem is written from the doubting son's point of view, and we can know about the father's attitude toward death only through the filter of what the son thinks and...

(read more from the Poem Summary section)

This section contains 805 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead Study Guide
Copyrights
Poetry for Students
Elegy for My Father, Who Is Not Dead from Poetry for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.