Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Essay

Blanche Wiesen Cook
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In the following review of the first volume of Eleanor Roosevelt, King says "Lesbianism is often on the author's mind and she goes out of her way to find it."

To qualify as a feminist heroine a woman must meet three tests. She must have a successful career "in her own right"; she must be "assertive and aggressive"; and she must have a pre-, extra-, or non-marital sex life, preferably ambidextrous.

What to do with Poor Nell, who did not even need to go through the trauma of changing her maiden name? Poor Nell, nicknamed "Granny" as a child and "Patient Griselda" as a young wife, who slept on the doormat rather than wake the servants. Poor Nell, whose sons claimed she didn't know what a lesbian was, whose daughter said she regarded marital relations as "an ordeal to be borne," and whose cousin, Alice Roosevelt Longworth, present...

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This section contains 1,003 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Study Guide
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Nonfiction Classics for Students
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