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Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Essay | Critical Essay #1

Blanche Wiesen Cook
This Study Guide consists of approximately 70 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933.
This section contains 1,735 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Study Guide

Critical Essay #1

Aubrey holds a Ph.D. in English. In this essay, he considers Cook's book in terms of some of the principles of feminist biography.

In her seminal work, Writing a Woman's Life (1988), feminist scholar Carolyn G. Heilbrun points out that it was not until recently that women found the means to write truthfully about their own lives. Up until about 1970, it was difficult even for women of achievement to break out of the passive mold—that centuries of cultural conditioning had imposed upon them—and take credit for their accomplishments. Following the conclusions of another scholar, Patricia Spacks, Heilbrun notes that when women such as Emmeline Pankhurst, Golda Meir, and Eleanor Roosevelt, all of whom made substantial contributions to history, wrote their autobiographies, they, in Spack's words, "fail directly to emphasize their own importance.... These women accept full blame for any failures in their lives, but shrink from...

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This section contains 1,735 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Study Guide
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Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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