Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 - Chapters 19 and 20 Summary & Analysis

Blanche Wiesen Cook
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Chapters 19 and 20 Summary

Eleanor's resistance to becoming the wife of the President of the United States is complicated by her major irritation of press coverage and the presses unrelenting interest in her personal life. Although she is always cordial and professional, Eleanor resents the intrusion into her life and evades the media at all times, gladly relinquishing the spotlight to Franklin.

Franklin's presidential campaign in 1932 immerses Eleanor in the publicity she abhors and she is not at all pleased to learn that the Associated Press has assigned a reporter named Lorena Hickok to dedicated coverage of her activities. Ironically, it is Eleanor's public persona related to women's rights and social reform that earns her the dubious distinction of being the first candidate's wife to merit press coverage.

Eventually, Eleanor warms to Lorena during time spent together on the campaign trail, and soon Eleanor begins to reveal information about...

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This section contains 777 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Study Guide
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