Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 - Chapters 14, 15, and 16 Summary & Analysis

Blanche Wiesen Cook
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Although Eleanor and Franklin both pursue political careers, Eleanor believes that men and women enter the area for different reasons; men pursue politics for career advancement while women choose politics to improve the daily conditions of life. Life for women in politics in the 1920s is not for the faint of heart and Eleanor aligns herself with her trusted women confidantes and intellectual partners who support and promote her objectives.

In spite of her wealth, Eleanor opts to work actively in her social and political organizations, which earns her the respect of those around her. Eleanor is driven by the courage of her convictions to not only speak out about inequities in society but to take action to create necessary change. This personal philosophy extends into Eleanor's lobbying for a reduced workweek of forty-eight hours for women working outside the home, and is the first to call her a "...

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This section contains 1,058 words
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Buy the Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Study Guide
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