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Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Chapter Summary & Analysis - Chapters 10 and 11 Summary

Blanche Wiesen Cook
This Study Guide consists of approximately 70 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933.
This section contains 771 words
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Purchase our Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Study Guide

Chapters 10 and 11 Summary

In the immediate aftermath of World War I, the Women's Suffrage Movement rises to prominence and Eleanor finds a cause with which she can associate and fully support. Eleanor also joins the League of Women Voters, the Women's Trade Union League, and the Foreign Policy Association. Eleanor's long-standing membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution is challenged when the organization takes an anti-radical position on education and books. Eleanor's stance is that poverty and injustice are the real threats to America, not necessarily Communism.

From this point, Eleanor adopts a position of progressive change, declaring, "Courage, justice and fair play do not breed revolutions, let us bear that in mind" (p. 244). Eleanor's efforts are directed toward racial equality; global peace; economic security and collective bargaining; the right of all for proper housing, education, and healthcare; and, international human rights. For the rest...

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This section contains 771 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 Study Guide
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Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume One, 1884-1933 from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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