East of the Mountains Quotes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 34 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of East of the Mountains.
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Tristan, in another time, had been boundlessly energetic; he’d had the habit of pursuing birds with earnest, exuberant, good intentions. Now, in his later years, he was increasingly deliberate, more reluctant to plunge into thorns, and generally stayed closer to hand. His tendency to range had been quieted.
-- Narrator (chapter 1 paragraph 10)

Importance: Ben’s dogs Tristan and Rex represent two different sides of his personality. This introduction of Tristan, the older dog, represents Ben’s suicidal thoughts and the extent to which he has given up on his life when the novel begins.

… when Rex hurled suddenly over the seat to settle his forepaws again on the rucksack, Ben felt a surge of anger. The dog had to learn his place in things, as Tristan before him had. He had to understand how it was.
-- Narrator (chapter 1 paragraph 53)

Importance: In contrast to Tristan, Rex represents Ben’s desire to live and to continue to contribute with his...

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This section contains 1,056 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the East of the Mountains Study Guide
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