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Drought Year Summary & Study Guide

This Study Guide consists of approximately 16 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Drought Year.
This section contains 492 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Drought Year Study Guide

Lines 1-4:

These lines depict the drought-benighted landscape. "Embered" and "burned" vividly describe the hot, dry air. The word "bear" in line three can be read in at least two ways: 1) the lime-scrub cannot bear the heat or 2) the lime-scrub cannot bear fruit. "Lime" suggests a certain tartness, which contributes well to the dry scene, and the "Mooni" of dried-up Mooni Creek brings to mind a picture of a waterless moon, a desert landscape where every year is a drought year.

Lines 6-11:

Three animals are present in the second stanza: the dingo, wagtail, and eel. The wagtail benefits from the drought by dining on the dying creatures ("seething" with maggots), the eel is one of those dying, and the dingo's condition is uncertain, strange. The Thirty-mile Dry is the name of the dried up creek or river, and the word "scrub" refers to low trees and bushes...

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This section contains 492 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Drought Year Study Guide
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Poetry for Students
Drought Year from Poetry for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.