Herman Wouk Writing Styles in Don't Stop the Carnival

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Point of View

The point of view in this novel is that of the omniscient narrator, probably the most common stylistic device in the traditional novel. Other authors, such as James Joyce, have experimented with unusual points of view such as the subconscious interior monologue of Molly Bloom in "Ulysses," or the intersecting streams of consciousness of several characters in William Faulkner's "As I Lay Dying." However, the reader senses that the voice within this narrative that is most directly that of the author is from Norman Paperman—who, like Herman Wouk—is a middle class, middle-aged New York Jewish man. Most of the events that unfold are seen and interpreted through the lens of Norman Paperman's personality, although many of the characters have very strong identities of their own.

The sensibilities of a middle class American form the touchstone by which other characters' motivations and actions...

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This section contains 671 words
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Buy the Don't Stop the Carnival Study Guide
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