Introduction & Overview of The Dog of Tithwal

Saadat Hasan Manto
This Study Guide consists of approximately 33 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Dog of Tithwal.
This section contains 272 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Dog of Tithwal Study Guide

The Dog of Tithwal Summary & Study Guide Description

The Dog of Tithwal Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

This detailed literature summary also contains Bibliography on The Dog of Tithwal by Saadat Hasan Manto.

The inspiration for Saadat Hasan Manto's "The Dog of Tithwal," first published in English in a 1987 collection of Manto's stories titled Kingdom's End and Other Stories, translated by Khalid Hasan, was the partition of India in 1947. The partition split India into Muslim Pakistan and secular (but Hindu-dominated and Hindu-ruled) India, resulting in violent upheaval. When the national boundaries were redrawn, India cut through the center of Pakistan, which was, therefore, itself a nation divided. In addition, Muslims and Hindus were so hostile to each other that Muslims who found themselves living in India and Hindus who found themselves living in Pakistan were suddenly aliens in their own homes. At best, they were coldly tolerated. At worst, they were robbed, raped, attacked, and murdered. Chaos erupted as sixteen million refugees literally ran for their lives to the nation where they would find safety. Violence escalated, and more than half a million people died in 1947 alone. The governments of the newly drawn nations, themselves in turmoil, were unable to contain the violence. In 1948, India and Pakistan went to war over territorial boundaries, principally which nation would govern Kashmir. The war, however, spread all along the frontier.

This tragedy was the impetus for "The Dog of Tithwal," which gives a microcosmic view of the hateful struggle. Although nature continues in harmony in the story's mountain setting, the Pakistani and Indian soldiers who face each other there cannot be at peace. Looking for ways to express their frustration at being unable to kill each other, the leaders of the two groups of soldiers terrorize and kill a friendly dog who is looking for companionship.

Read more from the Study Guide

This section contains 272 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Dog of Tithwal Study Guide
Copyrights
Gale
The Dog of Tithwal from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.