F. Scott Fitzgerald Writing Styles in The Diamond as Big as the Ritz

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Point of View

“The Diamond as Big as the Ritz” is told from the third person point of view, from the perspective of John T. Unger. Through Unger's perspective, Fitzgerald condemns not just the Washingtons’ amoral lifestyle, but also the middle-class attitude towards wealth that makes their lifestyle possible. The reader waits in vain for Unger to speak out, to express some outrage or horror at the Washingtons’ way of life, but until his own life is threatened, Unger seems willing to overlook almost anything to continue enjoying the luxuries and pleasures of their home. Because Unger is not as wealthy as his classmates at St. Midas, he is even more easily seduced by their lifestyle, and his astonishment at the home’s extravagance is more in line with what the average reader might feel.

Mythical Allusions

Many references to myths and fables make...

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This section contains 1,049 words
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Buy The Diamond as Big as the Ritz Study Guide
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