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Graham Greene Writing Styles in The Destructors

This Study Guide consists of approximately 75 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Destructors.
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Style

Paradox

Greene demonstrates the instability of postwar England in his presentation of opposing forces throughout "The Destructors." The tension created by these forces reflects a society that has survived trauma but is deeply changed by it. Social dynamics are undergoing change, and the youth no longer feel connected to the past, as previous generations did. Greene's writing often incorporates paradoxes, and in this story, paradoxes are used to communicate the atmosphere of the community in which the Wormsley Common gang functions.

Greene's use of paradox in the story is evident in T.'s attitudes toward Mr. Thomas. On the one hand, he sets about destroying his house, treating him disrespectfully, and regarding him with suspicion. At the same time, however, T. does not hate him. His intention to destroy Mr. Thomas's life is not personal but is rooted in his desire to get rid of the last vestige of...

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This section contains 622 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Destructors Study Guide
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The Destructors from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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