Literary Precedents for Daisy Miller

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As a novel of manners, Daisy Miller fits into the tradition of fiction that presents the prevailing modes of conduct peculiar to a specific time and place and examines how they control the characters' perceptions and behavior. This tradition reached its earliest perfection in Pride and Prejudice (1813) by Jane Austen, whom James admired intensely, and is best represented in America by Edith Wharton in The Age of Innocence (1920). James's interest in the "international theme" was partly stimulated by Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Marble Faun (1860) which focuses on American artists in Rome and deals with the differences between American and European manners and culture as well as with the themes of innocence vs. experience and naturalness vs.

artificiality.

Daisy is a classic portrayal of the American girl as spontaneous, selfreliant, natural and generous in spirit.

Her literary sisters include Jo March of Louisa May Alcott's Little Women (1868) and Penelope Lapham...

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This section contains 235 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Daisy Miller Study Guide
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