Crime and Punishment Essay

This Study Guide consists of approximately 89 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Crime and Punishment.
This section contains 1,497 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Crime and Punishment Study Guide

In the following essay, Connolly, a professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Virginia, reveals how Raskolnikov's plight is symbolic of Dostoyevsky's belief that those who seek a rationalistic solution to society's ills are doomed to failure if they neglect to understand the spiritual and emotional needs of humanity.

In Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky created an unforgettable novel of haunting intensity. With its sustained focus on the emotions and thoughts of its young protagonist, Rodion Raskolnikov, Dostoyevsky's novel provides a harrowing portrait of human error and misfortune. Dostoyevsky had originally intended to write an account of murder from the perspective of the murderer himself. As he worked on the project in November 1865, however, he concluded that such a perspective might be too limited, so he chose an omniscient, third-person narrative mode instead. Yet traces of the original design remain: much of the novel offers...

(read more from the Critical Essay #1 section)

This section contains 1,497 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Crime and Punishment Study Guide
Copyrights
Novels for Students
Crime and Punishment from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.